Tag Archives: Dark Chocolate

Fiore: Dark Chocolate Balsamic

24 Jul

I recently received this lovely bottle of Fiore Dark Chocolate Balsamic Vinegar as a gift. During my recipe research I found that balsamic vinegar is often paired with strawberries. I took full advantage of this common pairing for the dessert I chose to make. I wanted to explore the full range of flavors that can be inspired by balsamic vinegar, so I also made a savory dish of penne with beef and arugula.

Dessert First!

Strawberries Over Vanilla Ice Cream with Dark Chocolate Balsamic Vinegar Reduction

Strawberry Topping:

2 pints strawberries chopped

2 tablespoons sugar

2 tablespoons dark chocolate balsamic vinegar

1/4 teaspoon to a few grinds black pepper

Balsamic reduction:

3/4 cup dark chocolate balsamic vinegar

Introducing our cast of characters!

1. Chop your strawberries.

2. Add your sugar, balsamic, and a few grinds of black pepper.

3. Mix well. Make sure the strawberries are well blended with the other ingredients. Place in the fridge to rest. Stir periodically while cooking your dinner. This also gives you an excellent opportunity to test out your new strawberry mixture.

4. Pour your 3/4 cup of  dark chocolate balsamic vinegar into a small sauce pan and simmer until reduced by half. It took me about 20 minutes. Keep stirring and make sure the vinegar doesn’t burn.

When it is done the reduction should coat the spatula. As it cools the density will increase. When I was done with the reduction process the chocolate content had all floated to the surface so I had to fold it back in. Move the reduction into a serving vessel and set aside.

And now for dinner…

    Penne with Beef and Arugula
 recipe by Giada de Laurentiis
1 (1 pound) New York Strip Steak
1 teaspoon herbs de Provence
1 garlic clove, minced
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus 3 tablespoons
1 pound penne pasta
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more for steak and pasta water
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for steak
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil leaves
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves
2 cups arugula
1. Season your meat. I used italian seasoning instead of herbs de Provence.
2. While the meat is cooking set a pot to boil for the pasta. When the meat is done to your liking set it aside to rest.
3. As the pasta boils, wash the arugula and set it aside to be tossed with other ingredients.
5. Chop your fresh herbs, 1/4 cup basil and 1/4 cup parsley and add ground pepper and salt.
Combine with 3/4 cup of olive oil plus 3 Tbs, 1/4 cup dark chocolate balsamic vinegar, and 2 Tbs if dijon mustard for the dressing.
6. Thinly slice beef and toss with pasta, arugula, and dressing.
7. Serve and eat. It was delicious. I liked it so much I made it again a week later. The dark chocolate in the vinegar definitely added another dimension to the dish. The second time I made it I had run out of my dark chocolate Fiore and had to make it with regular balsamic vinegar. The chocolate lends a savory balance to the sweetness and tart kick, characteristic of balsamic vinegars.
And don’t forget dessert. After you have savored your dinner and cleared the dishes away at a leisurely pace pull your strawberries out of the fridge. Give them a stir. Scoop some ice cream into bowls, smother it with strawberries, and drizzle with your dark chocolate balsamic reduction. A little goes a long way. Enjoy this little twist on an old classic.
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AMANO: CHUAO Reserve Dark Chocolate 70%

27 Apr


I was very excited to try this chocolate after I read about the rarity of the beans and that it is of the original criollo strain, coming from a single village in Venezuela, the bar’s namesake, Chuao. Amano is also a very well established chocolate company in the world of  high quality chocolate with a very long list of awards.

This chocolate starts out with a full robust cacao flavor. For me there was no  other imposing taste at the beginning, it is just luxuriously chocolatey. The flavor rounded out into a smooth caramel that melted over my tongue, complemented  by the velvety texture of the chocolate. There was a very subtle tartness, similar to that you experience when you first bite into a plum. And then the caramel and cacao returned for the finish, lingering pleasantly.

Something to send you floating away into chocolatey dreams.

This is clearly a chocolate maker at the top of their game. With some chocolates it is possible to taste the evolution and development of their makers. They are delicious, but you know that they will improve and reach the height of their ability in the future. They may not be the most socially driven, but in the case of flavor and texture, Amano, meaning “by hand” and “they love” actually seems to be worth all the fuss.